General Presentation

The Municipality of Rawdon is located at the edge of the St. Lawrence lowlands where they meet the Laurentian mountain chain in Lanaudière. Located sixty (60) kilometres north of Montreal the Municipality has a well-developed road network: highway 125 is the main artery and highways 337, 341 and 348 converge near the town centre. The Municipality of Rawdon is located in the heart of the Lanaudière region and is the main entrance to the Matawinie regional county municipality.

Population in 2017: 11 281
Area km2: 197 km2
Inhabitant name: Rawdonnoise, Rawdonnois

 

Statistics (ref.: Statistics Canada)

 

History

Lord Francis RawdonOn July 13, 1799, the Township of Rawdon and its borders were formally recognized. There are two theories about how our municipality got its name. Some believe the municipality was named Rawdon in honour of Lord Francis Rawdon, Count of Moira and the Marquis of Hastings. Others think that it came from a city, village or township In England.

In 1824, the population of Rawdon was approximately 475 people, 75% of whom were of Irish descent. By 1844, francophones had become the majority. The population at this time continued to expand and business and industries sprang up.

In 1919, Rawdon was divided into the Township and the Village of Rawdon. Shortly after World War I, Russian, Hungarian, Polish, Ukrainian, Czechoslovakian and German families were charmed by the area and settled here. They brought with them a new vitality to the cultural and economic life. Rawdon has been known as the small community that the world calls home ever since. More than 40 cultural communities live together in our municipality. Rawdon is proud of its cultural mosaic image that distinguishes it from other municipalities.

On May 28, 1998, the government of Quebec issued a decree that created the new Municipality of Rawdon by merging the former municipal corporations of the Township and Village of Rawdon.